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UFC FN 143: Cejudo vs. Dillashaw
#71
(01-16-2019, 09:24 PM)MMACroatia Wrote: Zanimljivo
https://www.sherdog.com/news/news/TJ-Dil...52qQQ4R.99
Ma priča šuplje. On će u tom fightu raditi (ili bar pokušati) ono što je radio u bantamu. Ako se upusti u hrvanje spušit će lagano.

Neki zanimljivi podatci prije samog meča:
Quote:Cejudo is the only MMA fighter to win an Olympic gold medal and a UFC championship.
Cejudo is one of three Olympic gold medalists to fight in the UFC, along with Kevin Jackson and Mark Schultz. He earned gold in freestyle wrestling at the 2008 summer Olympics.
Cejudo is the only Olympic gold medalist to fight in the UFC since the organization was purchased by parent company Zuffa.
Cejudo is one of two flyweight champions in UFC history. Demetrious Johnson was the other.
Cejudo’s three-fight UFC winning streak in flyweight competition is tied for the second longest active streak in the division behind Deiveson Figueiredo (four).
Cejudo has landed at least one takedown against eight of his nine UFC opponents.
Cejudo has earned six of his seven UFC victories by decision.
Dillashaw can become the fourth simultaneous two-division champion in UFC history. Conor McGregor, Daniel Cormier and Amanda Nunes have accomplished the feat.
Dillashaw is the first champion in UFC history from a higher weight class who will attempt to drop down a division to win a second belt.
Dillashaw is one of eight fighters in UFC history to have two title reigns in a single weight class. Randy Couture, Tim Sylvia, Cain Velasquez, Matt Hughes, Georges St-Pierre, Jose Aldo and Dominick Cruz also accomplished the feat.
Dillashaw is one of seven cast members from “The Ultimate Fighter” to win an undisputed UFC championship.
Dillashaw’s 12 victories in UFC bantamweight competition are the most in divisional history.
Dillashaw’s 12 victories in UFC/WEC bantamweight competition are tied with Cruz for most in combined divisional history.
Dillashaw’s eight stoppage victories in UFC bantamweight competition are the most in divisional history.
Dillashaw’s seven knockout victories in UFC bantamweight competition are most in divisional history.
Dillashaw’s nine knockdowns landed in UFC bantamweight competition are most in divisional history.
Dillashaw’s eight fight-night bonuses for UFC bantamweight bouts are the most in divisional history.
Dillashaw is one of two fighters in UFC history to land 100 or more significant strikes in five consecutive fights. Joanna Jedrzejczyk also accomplished the feat.
Dillashaw scored the latest head-kick knockout finish in UFC history when he stopped Joe Soto at the 2:20 mark of Round 5 at UFC 177.
Dillashaw is one of two fighters in UFC history to earn two or more fifth-round stoppage victories. Johnson also accomplished the feat.
#72
Bolji je Cejudo ali mislim da bi se TJ na veličinu mogao izvuć u hrvanju,mada prvi put ide ovdje dolje i sigurno da će mu bit drugačije.
Ipak je on TAM škola di su svi bili dobri hrvači i dobri u vraćanju na noge i zasad je to i pokazao.Cruz je jedini koji ga je nadhrvao ali ruku na srce on nije nikada bio neki top control tip tako da će ga ovdje Cejudo puno bolje testirati.Ali morat će i Cejudo više pokazat nego dosada,jeben meč u svakom pogledu.

I da ovo da je TJ zadnji koji je pobjedio sa head kickom??Ne zvuči mi to točnim.

https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2019/j...l-ostovich
When injustice becomes law,resistance becomes duty
The will of the strong will never be shaken by doubts of the weak
The hardest choices require the strongest will
Anyone can deal with victory.Only the mighty can bear defeat
#73
Da je borba u bantamu TJ bi ga pojeo, a ovako ne znam
#74
Quote:I da ovo da je TJ zadnji koji je pobjedio sa head kickom??Ne zvuči mi to točnim.
Krivo si preveo. Hoće reći da je njegov high kick najkasniji high kick u povijesti UFC-a. Vremenski.
#75
Tako već da
When injustice becomes law,resistance becomes duty
The will of the strong will never be shaken by doubts of the weak
The hardest choices require the strongest will
Anyone can deal with victory.Only the mighty can bear defeat
#76
Quote:The first metric that stands out when looking at this fight is a simple one. These gentlemen tend to win their fights differently: Dillashaw with a 58.3% KO/TKO rate and Cejudo with an 85.7% decision rate. Yet when the closeness of their bouts is quantified, both fighters lean slightly towards being more involved in blowouts with an identical score of 36 (0-100 scale, see notes below) than the flyweight average of 41.
For fight positioning, both fighters are generally happy to stand and trade at distance for the majority of a 5-minute round (3:23 Cejudo, 3:59 Dillashaw) while Cejudo tends to spend a few more seconds clinched up and on the ground than Dillashaw.
Every fight starts at distance and since these two guys each have exceptional takedown defense, this one might just stay there. Dillashaw’s the volume striker at distance, throwing 11.3 more head jabs per five minutes in the position (P5M) than Cejudo and 4.5 more power strikes.
Cejudo barely jabs and when he does he lands at a paltry 13% rate. He’s mostly throwing power to the head with a roughly typical flyweight mix to the head, body, and legs (30.7, 5.3, and 2.8 respective attempts P5M). Dillashaw is more body- and leg-centric, and leg attacks are one area he takes a statistical edge against his opponents.
Dillashaw basically lands even with opponents in power to the head and body (9.3 and 3.9 P5M for Dillashaw, 9.4 and 3.8 for opponents). He gets his distance striking differential edge with +1.1 on head jabs and +1.8 on power to the legs P5M, but his biggest edge is that when he connects solid, opponents are likely to drop. His three knockdown metrics (percent rounds, rate, and percentage) are between 2.5-6.0x the featherweight average (yes, I know he’s a bantamweight) while Cejudo drops foes between 1.2-2.0x. Cejudo’s distance striking game tends to outland opponents with power to the head and body while absorbing more head jabs and power shots to the legs.
Distance striking seems to edge towards Dillashaw but the bantamweight champ’s also been vulnerable at times. His statistical head power defense hasn’t been quite as good as Cejudo (30% absorbed to Cejudo’s 24%) and his defensive knocked down metrics are all worse than Cejudo and 2-of-3 are worse than average (percent rounds and rate).
Neither fighter shoots many takedowns at distance, but at 47% (Dillashaw) and 42% (Cejudo), they’ve both been relatively successful when they have. The problem for each on Saturday will be that the other guy’s distance takedown defense is on point (87% defended for Dillashaw, 85% for Cejudo).
The clinch is a position where Cejudo tends to spend more time each round, but Dillashaw tends to be the one pressuring into the cage (74% to Cejudo’s 45%). They’re each high-volume clinch strikers with Dillashaw focusing mostly on the head while Cejudo mixes it up almost evenly between the head and body (24.4 and 23.5 power attempts to the head and body vs. 13.3 and 9.6 for the typical flyweight).
Should someone go for a clinch takedown, it’s usually Cejudo at 6.2 attempts P5M (5.4 average, 2.5 Dillashaw). His 42% success rate is slightly below average, but the former Olympic gold medalist Cejudo has a much better mix of volume and success than Dillashaw, with the bantamweight champ’s aforementioned clinch takedown volume relatively low and success rate coming in at only 22%. Oh yeah, and both champions have yet to be taken down from the clinch in the UFC.
On the ground, we’re dealing with two fighters who are almost always on top. Cejudo’s spent four seconds on bottom and almost 21 minutes on top while Dillashaw’s spent 96% of his 33 ground minutes in top position.
So who will be on top this time? It might be no one. But if it’s Cejudo, he’ll have to deal with a Dillashaw standup rate that’s 629% better than the flyweight average. For perspective, Cejudo noticeably focused on keeping Demetrious Johnson on the ground at UFC 227. It worked enough to nab the flyweight title from the long-time champ, but DJ’s standup rate was only 120% better than average.
If Dillashaw ends up on top, we don’t know much statistically about Cejudo’s bottom game. What we do know is that Dillashaw tends to have half guard or better 43% of his ground control time and lands an outstanding 39.2 power shots P5M (14.7 average).
Zanimljivo posebice ovaj predzadnji paragraf.
#77
...


E ovo je također i moje razmišljanje u vezi ove borbe. Zato ne volim da šampion iz veće kategorije napada onog u nižoj. Nema logike. Trebali su ovo napraviti kao fight gdje su oba pojasa u igri. Ionako po Whiteovim komentarima sa konferencije (tj ponašanju) da se zaključiti kako će ova kategorija biti mrtva neovisno o rezultatu.
Quote:Aren’t they already fighting for the 135-pound belt, when you think about it? The rules say that, in a bantamweight title fight, you can weigh in no heavier than 135 pounds. If you show up at 133 pounds, the title’s still on the line. Being under the weight limit doesn’t affect the status of the fight.
So whether T.J. Dillashaw successfully makes flyweight or not, as long as he’s 135 pounds or under we ought to consider the bantamweight title on the line. After all, how could he lose to Henry Cejudo and still claim legitimacy at a higher weight class? The whole champion aura will crumble. Might as well put the belt in the mail and send it off to Cejudo’s house.
  
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